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Thursday, August 31, 2017

Economic Updates, Best of the Left on Revolution Radio -- August 31 2017

7:30 Richard Wolff's Economic Updates:

1. Human Rights vs Water Economies: Updates on Trump vs Amazon over taxes, Americans dying younger, Monsanto profits at farmers' expense, and economics of homeless school children. Interview Ron Robinson on US crisis around access to and safety of water in US.

2.  Collective Action, for a change:  "Updates on consumers' battling airplane seat shrinkage, on a "free" press and buyers of Chicago's Sun-Times, on fake "jobs creation" for subsidies and publicity, and new museum features artists challenging capitalism. Interview Dr. Harriet Fraad on how and why so many hesitate so long before joining collective action to change economic and social conditions."

3. Belabored by Dissent: 
For the third time in recent months, a major union election has gone down to defeat in a Southern manufacturing facility—this time at the Nissan plant in Canton, Mississippi. The union busting was fierce and the support from politicians like Bernie Sanders and Jackson’s Chokwe Antar Lumumba and celebrities like Danny Glover wasn’t enough to put the workers over the top, but was there anything that could have been done differently? We speak with Chris Brooks of Labor Notes about organizing the South, the structural challenges the workers faced, and ideas for new strategies for organizing in an increasingly union-free USA.

We also look at an auto mechanics’ strike in Chicago and a union win at Facebook, at the dystopian horizon of Trumpian immigration policies, and microchips in workers’ bodies, implanted by the boss. For Argh, we consider the power of police union contracts, and the question of race in the battle against capital.

4. Belabored by Dissent 2:

Before fascism and political turmoil descended on the country this week, Trump was scheduled to showcase his grand plan for overhauling the nation’s infrastructure. So while you’re on the frontlines of resistance, we take a close look at Trump’s plan to stealthily privatize massive chunks of the the government, what it means for both public and private sector labor, and how the labor movement should respond. We speak with Georgetown history professor Joseph McCartin about the history of public worker unionism, the legacy of PATCO (the anti-union war waged by the President who was just anointed as Trump’s labor hero), and how today’s workers can build power across the workforce.
In other news we look at labor against white supremacy in California and North Carolina, scandal at the UAW, mobilizing against right-to-work in Missouri, and unions at the NAFTA talks. With reflections on why baby poop and marriage are labor issues.



Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Seeking political power for working families -- Aug. 30


Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017

8:00 am -- We'll discuss some plans for 2018 and beyond of the West Virginia Working Families Party, formally launched this past weekend, with Ryan Frankenberry, its new state Director. "You are the people who can transform this state," Stephen Smith, Executive Director of the WV Healthy Kids and Families Coalition,  told activists in an earlier announcement.. "Many of you are already leading efforts that put real power in the hands of everyday West Virginia families.  We have more people organizing in the streets, in neighborhoods, and online than we have in years," added Smith, also one of the party's State Committee members, "We now have an opportunity to translate that grassroots energy into political power."  Party officials have said it "has no plans to be on-the-ballot."  Rather, Working Families will recruit, support and "endorse candidates from any party, or no party, that will fight for us," said Smith.

Knocking on doors for the 2018 election -- Aug. 30

Wednesday, Aug. 30, 2017


8:30 am -- We'll discuss an important part of any election campaign -- canvassing -- with Mavery Davis of Rise Up WV, a grassroots resistance group based in Charleston. Rise Up WV - Facebook > "Canvassing can be an important component of organizing toward a goal," said Vigilance Jefferson County. "It can help us get a sense of where our community stands on an issue, help recruit new members, help promote event outreach, and can be used to gather information and stories for Op-Eds or other media." Rise Up WV is reported to have had surprising success using canvassing as a key piece of healthcare strategy. This interview was rescheduled from an earlier date..

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Monday, August 28, 2017

Enlighten Radio Podcasts: Podcast: The Poetry Show -- The Elephant that Chal...

Enlighten Radio Podcasts: Podcast: The Poetry Show -- The Elephant that Chal...: This podcast of the poetry show was broadcast at EnlightenRadio.org studio -- the Red Caboose in Harpers Ferry, WV -- August 28, 2017. The P...

Jackson Browne, Pablo Neruda, Rainer Maria Rilke, and some Beats -- on the poetry show

6:30 -- The poetry show warm-up begins with music by Jackson, a review of the Beats and recordings, and Dylan's Nobel Masterpiece.

7:30: Odes from Pablo Neruda, and Elegies from Rainer Maria Rilke, humor from James Thurber


Later today:

Noon: Fanny and Stas do Storytelling -- Storyteller Megan Hicks comes to the Red Caboose in Bolivar, WV to Broadcast live!


Even Later: Old Time Radio -- Philip Marlowe from CBS Radio

Even Later: Blues till dawn -- Live concerts -- a heads up on who they are a bit later!

peace




Sunday, August 27, 2017

Enlighten Radio Update - August 27, 2017

Enlighten Radio has migrated from Shepherdstown to the Red Caboose in Harpers Ferry/Bolivar.

A lot of changes are in the works on programming.

1. All recorded music, literature, talk, podcasts, etc, will be either live from free sources, or in the public domain.

2. Live Shows include:


  • The Winners and Losers Radio Program -- Monday thru Friday (most weeks, 6:30 - 9 AM. Our player is always on!
    • Monday -- the Poetry Show -- This week features a return to Neruda and Rilke, and some original parables. James Thurber also makes an appearance.
    • Tuesday: the Mike Diesel, John Case and Stewart Acuff Old Men's Naked News Review. Only those of us able to rise on time may appear.
    • Wednesday: Gayle Becker continues guests from the progressive movements.
    • Thursday: Revolution Radio
    • Friday:  the local calendar and news.
    • Winners and losers shows may include recorded excerpts of content from Richard Wolfe's Economic Update, Best of the Left, Moonshine Jesus, Jared Bernstein's podcasts, and other diverse sources. 
  • Fanny Crawford and Stas Zielkowski Storytelling Hour -- Noon Mondays
  • Stewart Acuff's Resistance Radio: Thursdays, 10 AM
  • Dr Zakee McGee's Health and Wellness Tuesdays -- the Are You Crazy? Show -- 10 AM

Live Music Genre Schedule:

Sunday: Bluegrass, Gospel
Monday: Blues at night after Old Time Radio Stories.
Tuesday: Country Music -- all trends
Wednesday: Jazz
Thursday: Rock and Roll, soft, hard, up all the time, and can't get it up.
Friday: folk and more bluegrass
Saturday: Jazz.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Big changes at enlighten radio

New studio in Bolivar!!

Although the poetry show is postponed till next week, storytelling with Fanny and Stas is at noon, as well excerpts from the Silmarllian

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Coming to terms with the country's racism -- Aug. 16



Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017

8:00 am --  An official of the West Virginia Council of Churches, which represents 14 Christian denominations, will discuss its formal condemnation of the violence in Charlottesville and efforts to counteract what it says is "racism endemic in our society." Among factors to blame, reports Rev. Jeffrey (Jeff) Allen, Director of the council < www.wvcc.org >, is "the deterioration of political debate in our society." It is expressed "through the demonization of political adversaries, falsehood masquerading as truth for political gain, and the corrosive effect of anonymous money," says the organization's statement on Saturday. "We unequivocally reaffirm our belief that Black lives do matter and that our country must come to terms with the racism endemic in our society." 


Knocking on doors for the 2018 election -- Aug. 16



Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017


8:30 am -- We'll discuss an important part of any election campaign -- canvassing -- with Mavery Davis of Rise Up WV, a grassroots resistance group based in Charleston. Rise Up WV - Facebook > "Canvassing can be an important component of organizing toward a goal," reports Vigilance Jefferson County. "It can help us get a sense of where our community stands on an issue, help recruit new members, help promote event outreach, and can be used to gather information and stories for Op-Eds or other media."  Rise Up WV is said to have been seeing surprising success in using its canvass as a key piece of healthcare strategy. Those running a recent canvassing workshop at Shepherd University shared ways to handle the challenging moments of knocking on doors, and ease the anxiety we may feel. This interview was rescheduled from last week due to equipment malfunction at the time..




Monday, August 14, 2017

The Poetry Show -- Jeanne Wagner - 8/14/17

Jeanne Wagner is a native of San Francisco, California. She has B.A. from the University of California Berkeley in German and an M.A. from San Francisco State in Humanities. A retired tax accountant, she began writing seriously in 1996. Since then she has published four chapbooks and two full length collections and has won several national awards. The chapbooks are The Falling Woman (Pudding House Press, 2001), The Conjurer (Anabiosis Press, 2004), Medusa in Therapy (Poets Corner Press, 2008) and The Genesis Machine (Sow's Ear Poetry Review, 2017), winner of the 2016 Sow's Ear Chapbook Competition. Her full-length collections are The Zen Piano Mover, winner of the 2004 Stevens Manuscript Prize, and In the Body of Our Lives (Sixteen Rivers Press, 2010). Among her prizes and honors are the National Foundation of State Poetry Societies Founders Award, the Ann Stanford Prize, and the Frances Locke Award. She has also won the Hayden's Ferry Flash Prose Competition and the 2013 Thomas Merton Prize for Poetry of the Sacred. 

Her poems vary in subject from the scientific to the personal, from nature to mythology, and they reflect her curiosity about and engagement with the world on many levels. In an interview with William Ruof, she reflects on memory: "Memory is like Schrödinger's Cat, it changes the moment you peer into the box where you think it is kept." 

This week's featured poem is "The Disappearance of the Polar Bears," from her collection In the Body of Our Lives (Sixteen Rivers Press, 2010). 

THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE POLAR BEARS

They were our saints and our hermits,
our ursine angels. 

In exile they found a promised land
where cold

condensed under their feet and they
walked on it; 

where they moved soundlessly as ghosts, 
hearing, 

even under ice, the strenuous beating
hearts of seals. 

Some journeyed as far north as the Pole, 
that skullcap of ice, 

its whiteness the imagined afterlife of
ordinary bears, 

their bodies solid as icons: squared off
limbs, shoulders that

tapered to a muzzled head, dog-small
and low-slung. 

Yet who could fail to love their
black-eyed cubs, 

born with the furred innocence 
of harp seals, 

or the way they swam, legs paddling
in circles, 

tractionless as the running in our
dreams. 

That's why I keep this image of
a single bear

standing on the pole, his white body
on the whiter ice, 

like the pulse of something warm
inside the cold. 

Could the problem be the airplanes, 
when they scattered

the angels from their wisps of cirrus
cloud, while below, 

on cruise ship tables, ice sculptures
slowly began to melt away? 


Writing prompt of the week: Choose any compelling image from the natural world. While describing it, add in a supernatural or mythological image, the way Jeanne Wagner blends angels and polar bears in her poem. 

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
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Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Knocking on doors for the 2018 election -- Aug. 9



Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017


8:30 am -- We'll discuss an important part of any election campaign -- canvassing -- with Rise Up WV, a grassroots resistance group based in Charleston. "Canvassing can be an important component of organizing toward a goal," reports Vigilance Jefferson County. "It can help us get a sense of where our community stands on an issue, help recruit new members, help promote event outreach, and can be used to gather information and stories for Op-Eds or other media."  Rise Up WV is said to have been seeing surprising success in using its canvass as a key piece of healthcare strategy. Those running a recent canvassing workshop at Shepherd University shared a number of ways to handle the challenging moments of knocking on doors, and ease the anxiety we may feel. 

Monday, August 7, 2017

The Poetry Show -- Aug 7 -- Carl Dennis

Carl Dennis was born in St. Louis, Missouri on September 17, 1939. Neither of his parents were literary; his father founded a chemical company and his mother had been a registered nurse, although she had a strong interest in the arts. However, Carl Dennis had an inspirational and influential high school English teacher, Augusta Gottlieb. After high school he searched for a college that would resemble "the ideal Platonic Academy," attending Oberlin College and the University of Chicago before graduating from the University of Minnesota. He went on to earn a Ph.D. in English literature from the University of California at Berkeley and subsequently to teach at the University of Buffalo (1966-2001), where he now holds the title of Artist-in-Residence. Dennis has published twelve volumes of poetry, including the Pulitzer Prize winning Practical Gods (Penguin, 2001), a New and Selected Poems 1974-2004 (Penguin, 2004) and, most recently, Another Reason (Penguin, 2014). Additionally he has written a book of literary criticism, Poetry as Persuasion: an Essay for Writers (University of Georgia Press, 2001). He has received many honors, including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts and, in 2000, the prestigious Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, awarded to a living author for outstanding achievement in poetry.  

Carl Dennis is a strong proponent of poetry that is clear and comprehensible. He has said, "I believe poetry should sound like natural speech. When you hear a poem, you should feel that someone is standing behind the lines, talking to an individual, offering a script that something might want to enter." In a similar vein, on the usefulness of poetry, he said, "Poetry is useful in that it allows readers to feel that they are not alone, that others have thought and felt as they have. It can do this more powerfully than any other kind of writing, or at least more directly,  because in a good poem we are made to feel that we are in the presence of a whole human being speaking to us directly, or providing a script for us to enter as we see fit." 

This week's featured poem, "Not the Idle" from Practical Gods (Penguin, 2001), is a meditation on what might appear to be idleness and a reminder that things are not always as they seem.

NOT THE IDLE

It's not the idle who move us but the few
Often confused with the idle, those who define
Their project in life in terms so ample
Nothing they ever do is a digression. 
Each episode contributes its own rare gift
As a chapter in Moby Dick on squid or hardtack
Is just as important to Ishmael as a fight with a whale. 
The few who refuse to live for the plot's sake, 
Major or minor, but for texture and tone and hue. 
For them weeding a garden all afternoon
Can't be construed as a detour from the road of life. 
The road narrows to a garden path that turns
And circles to show that traveling goes only so far
As a metaphor. The day rests on the grass. 
And at night the books of these few, 
Lined up on their desks, don't look like drinks
Lined up on a bar to help them evade their troubles. 
They look like an escort of mountain guides
Come to conduct the climber to a lofty outlook
Rising serene above the fog. For them the view
Is no digression though it won't last long
And they won't remember even the vivid details. 
The supper with friends back in the village
In a dining room brightened with flowers and paintings
No digression for them, though the talk leads
To no breakthrough. The topic they happen to hit on
Isn't a ferry to carry them over the interval
Between soup and salad. It's a raft drifting downstream
Where the banks widen to embrace a lake
And birds rise from the reeds in many colors. 
Everyone tries to name them and fails
For an hour no one considers idle. 


Friday, August 4, 2017

Enlighten Radio Podcasts: Podcast: Diesel and Case on Moby Dick and Senator ...

Enlighten Radio Podcasts: Podcast: Diesel and Case on Moby Dick and Senator ...: This podcast was broadcast August 3, 2017 on EnlightenRadio.org 1. Musical Theme: The Clancy Bros and Tommy Makem -- Carnegie Hall,...

Diesel and Case Review the West Virginia Carnage

Enlighten Radio Lineup -- August 4, 2017


1. The Winners and losers radio program -- 6:30 - 9:00 -- Mike and John do a survey of the carnage on the West Virginia political scene. Is it really real, Momma?

2. Revolution Radio: Introduction and terms


Thursday, August 3, 2017

Winners and Losers: Shelley's Reply, John Brown Unrevised,

Enlighten Radio Lineup -- August 3, 2017

1. Musical Theme: The Clancy Bros and Tommy Makem -- Carnegie Hall, 1962

2. The Winners and Losers Radio Program: 6:30 - 9:00 AM -- Mike Diesel and Case do a "drunks delight" version of news and views. First: Shelley Moore Capito's explanation of her health care votes. Second: People who do not like, or have no personal analog in,  Moby Dick, may be deported in the near future. Third: Who is John P Kelley. Fourth. Trump signs unconstitutional bill interfering with his own "foreign policy".

3. Revolution Radio: 9:00 -- 10:30 John Brown by WEB Dubois.

4. Wonk city -- check later

woof woof

Wednesday, August 2, 2017